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Recipient Objects

Recipient Objects :-

This part includes the information on Recipient Objects options introduced in Exchange Server 2007.

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1. What is recipient in Exchange Server 2007?

In Microsoft Exchange Server 2007, recipients are comprised of mailbox users, mail-enabled users, mail contacts, distribution groups, security groups, dynamic distribution groups, and mail-enabled public folders.

2. What is a recipient objects?

  1. Mailbox-enabled recipients
  2. Mail-enabled
  3. Contacts
  4. Resource mailbox

 

3. How you manage recipients in Exchange Server 2007?

In previous versions of Exchange Server, you performed recipient management tasks in Active Directory Users and Computers. In Exchange 2007, you can perform these management tasks in both the Exchange Management Console and the Exchange Management Shell. However, although you can perform all recipient management tasks in the Exchange Management Shell, only some are performed in the Exchange Management Console.

4. What are the Exchange Recipient types? Explain them?

A recipient is any mail-enabled object in the Active Directory directory service to which Exchange can deliver or route messages.

User mailbox: A mailbox that is assigned to an individual user in your Exchange organization. It typically contains messages, calendar items, contacts, tasks, documents, and other important business data.

Linked mailbox: A mailbox that is assigned to an individual user in a separate, trusted forest

Shared mailbox: A mailbox that is not primarily associated with a single user and is generally configured to allow logon access for multiple users

Legacy mailbox: A mailbox that resides on a server running Exchange Server 2003 or Exchange 2000 Server.

Resource mailboxes are mailboxes that represent conference rooms or shared equipment. Resource mailboxes can be included as resources in meeting requests, providing a simple and efficient way to utilize resources for an organization.

Two types Room and Resource Mailboxes

Room mailbox: A resource mailbox that is assigned to a meeting location, such as a conference room, auditorium, or training room. Room mailboxes can be included as resources in meeting requests, providing a simple and efficient way of organizing meetings for your users

Equipment mailboxes are assigned to a resource that is not location specific, such as a portable computer projector, microphone, or company car

5. What is a mailbox-enabled object?

Users can log on to networks and access domain resources. Users can be added to groups and appear in the global address list (GAL).

Mailbox-enabled users can send and receive messages and store messages on their Exchange server.

6. What is mail-enabled object?

Mail-enabled users can receive messages at an external e-mail address only. They cannot send or store messages on Exchange.

7. What is mail contact?

Mail contacts are mail-enabled Active Directory directory service objects that contain information about people or organizations that exist outside your Exchange organization. Mail contacts are ideal for representing people external to your Exchange organization who do not need access to any internal resources

There are two types of mail contacts in Exchange 2007: mail contacts and mail forest contacts. Mail forest contacts are read-only recipient objects that are updated only through Microsoft Identity Integration Server (MIIS) or a similar custom synchronization. You cannot remove or modify a mail forest contact by using the Exchange Management Console or the Exchange Management Shell.

8. What is the difference between Mail contact and Mail user?

Mail contacts are mail-enabled Active Directory directory service objects that contain information about people or organizations that exist outside your Exchange organization. Mail contacts are ideal for representing people external to your Exchange organization who do not need access to any internal resources.

Mail users are similar to mail contacts. Both have external e-mail addresses, contain information about people outside your Exchange organization, and can be displayed in the GAL and other address lists. However, unlike a mail contact, mail users have Active Directory logon credentials and can access resources to which they are granted permission. If a person external to your organization requires access to resources on your network, you should create a mail user instead of a mail contact

9. What is a Distribution group? What are the supported distribution groups in Exchange Server 2007?

Distribution groups are mail-enabled Active Directory directory service group objects that are created to expedite the mass sending of e-mail messages and other information within an Exchange organization.

Exchange 2007 supports the following types of distribution groups:

  • Mail-enabled universal distribution groups   These are Active Directory distribution group objects that are mail-enabled. They can be used only to distribute messages to a group of recipients.
  • Mail-enabled universal security groups   These are Active Directory security group objects that are mail-enabled. They can be used to grant access permissions to resources in Active Directory and can also be used to distribute messages.
  • Mail-enabled non-universal groups These are Active Directory global or local group objects that are mail-enabled. In Exchange 2007, you can create or mail-enable only universal distribution groups. You may have mail-enabled groups that were migrated from previous versions of Exchange that are not universal groups. These groups can still be managed by using the Exchange Management Console or the Exchange Management Shell.
  • Dynamic distribution groups   These are distribution groups for which membership is based on specific recipient filters rather than a defined set of recipients. Dynamic distribution groups were called query-based distribution groups in Exchange 2003.

10. How to view the members of the Dynamic distribution Group?

Open the Exchange Management Console to preview the list of members for a dynamic distribution group that uses a pre scanned filter

  1. Start the Exchange Management Console.
  2. In the console tree, expand Recipient Configuration, and then click Distribution Group.
  3. In the result pane, select the dynamic distribution group for which you want to preview the list of members.
  4. In the action pane, under the dynamic distribution group name, click Properties.
  5. In <Dynamic distribution group> Properties, click the Conditions tab.
  6. Click Preview

11. What permission is required to create a recipient type?

To create a Recipient in Exchange Server 2007, you should have the following permission

  • Exchange Recipient Administrator role
  • Account Operator role for the applicable Active Directory containers

12. What is Microsoft Exchange recipient?

The Microsoft Exchange recipient is a special Microsoft Exchange Server 2007 recipient object that provides a unified and well-known message sender that differentiates system-generated messages from other messages. The Microsoft Exchange recipient is functionally equivalent to an internal postmaster. The Microsoft Exchange recipient replaces the “System Administrator” sender that was used for system-generated messages in earlier versions of Microsoft Exchange Server. Messages from the Microsoft Exchange recipient display “Microsoft Exchange” as the sender. The types of messages that are sent by the Microsoft Exchange recipient include the following:

  • DSN messages
  • Journal reports
  • Quota messages
  • Agent-generated messages

13. How to manage Microsoft Exchange Recipient?

The Microsoft Exchange recipient isn’t a typical recipient object, such as a mailbox, mail user, or mail contact. The Microsoft Exchange recipient isn’t managed by using the typical recipient tools that are found in Microsoft Management Console or the Exchange Management Shell. However, you can use the Set-OrganizationConfig cmdlet in the Exchange Management Shell to perform the following tasks that define the characteristics of the Microsoft Exchange recipient:

  • Allow or prevent the application of the default e-mail address policy to the Microsoft Exchange recipient. By default, the default mail address policy is applied to the Microsoft Exchange recipient.
  • Configure a recipient object to receive messages that are sent to the Microsoft Exchange recipient. By default, no recipient is configured to receive messages that are sent to the Microsoft Exchange recipient.
  • Configure the e-mail addresses of the Microsoft Exchange recipient. This includes specifying a primary Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) address.

14. What is a Recipient scope?

Recipient scope refers to the specified portion of the Active Directory directory service hierarchy that the Exchange Management Console and the Exchange Management Shell uses for recipient management. When you set the recipient scope to a specific location within Active Directory, you can view and manage all recipients stored in that location and all of the containers under it. 

15. What is MIME and MAPI?

MIME = Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions It defines non-ASCII message formats. It is a coding standard that defines the structure of E-Mails and other Internet messages. MIME is also used for declaration of content from other Internet protocols like HTTP, Desktop environments like KDE, Gnome or Mac OS X Aqua. The standard is defined in RFC 2045.

With MIME it is possible to exchange information about the type of messages (the content type) between the sender and the recipient of the message. MIME also defines the art of coding (Content-Transfer-Encoding).

MAPI = Messaging Application Programming Interface It’s the programming interface for email. It is a Microsoft Windows program interface that enables you to send e-mail from within a Windows application and attach the document you are working on to the e-mail note. Applications that take advantage of MAPI include word processors, spreadsheets, and graphics applications. MAPI-compatible applications typically include a Send Mail or Send in the File pulls down menu of the application. Selecting one of these sends a request to a MAPI server

16. What are the client options available to access the mails?

  1. Outlook 2003/2007
  2. Outlook web access
  3. Outlook Mobile access
  4. Outlook voice access
  5. IMAP4/POP3

17. What is OWA?

OWA is to access the mail via browser from outside the corporate network. The Outlook Web Access (OWA) client is now nearly indistinguishable from the full Outlook client. The one major component missing is offline capability, but nearly every other Outlook functionality is part of OWA.

18. What is Exchange Active sync?

ActiveSync provides for synchronized access to email from a handheld device, such as a Pocket PC or other Windows Mobile device. It allows for real-time send and receives functionality to and from the handheld, through the use of push technology.

19. What is Outlook Anywhere?

Outlook Anywhere (previously known as RPC over HTTP) is a method by which a full Outlook client can dynamically send and receive messages directly from an Exchange server over an HTTP or Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) web connection. This allows for virtual private network (VPN)–free access to Exchange data, over a secured HTTPS connection.

20. What is POP3?

The Post Office Protocol 3 (POP3) is a legacy protocol that is supported in Exchange 2007. POP3 enables simple retrieval of mail data via applications that use the POP3 protocol. Mail messages, however, cannot be sent with POP3 and must use the SMTP engine in Exchange. By default, POP3 is not turned on and must be explicitly activated.

21. What is IMAP4?

Legacy Interactive Mail Access Protocol (IMAP) access to Exchange is also available, which can enable an Exchange server to be accessed via IMAP applications, such as some UNIX mail clients. As with the POP3 protocol, IMAP support must be explicitly turned on.

22. What is RPC over HTTP?

The RPC over HTTP protocol allows your full Outlook 2003 MAPI clients to connect to Exchange 2003 Servers using HTTP/HTTPS. This solves the problem remote Outlook 2003 users have when located behind restrictive firewalls.

By using RPC over HTTP, users no longer have to use a virtual private network (VPN) connection to connect to Exchange mailboxes. Users who are running Outlook 2003 on client computers can connect to an Exchange server in a corporate environment from the Internet. The Windows RPC over HTTP feature enables an RPC client such as Outlook 2003 to establish connections across the Internet by tunneling the RPC traffic over HTTP.

23. What are the requirements to use RPC over HTTP?

Server Requirement

RPC over HTTP/S requires Windows Server 2003 and Exchange Server 2003. RPC over HTTP/S also requires Windows Server 2003 in a Global Catalog role.

Client Requirement

The client computer must be running Microsoft Windows XP Professional Service Pack 1 (SP1) or later.

The client computer must be running Microsoft Office Outlook 2003.

24. What is the procedure to configure RPC over HTTP?

Verify that your server computer and your client computer meet the requirements to use RPC over HTTP/S.

  • Configure Exchange to use RPC over HTTP/S.
  • Configure the RPC virtual directory in Internet Information Services.
  • Configure the RPC proxy server to use specific ports.
  • Configure your client computers to use RPC over HTTP/S

25. What are the mailbox permissions available in Exchange Server 2007?

You can configure the following mailbox permissions:

  • · Full Access
  • · External Account
  • · Delete Item
  • · Read Permission
  • · Change Permission
  • · Change Owner

In addition to the standard Active Directory permissions that you can configure on any user object, you can grant permissions that apply only to mailbox-enabled users. These additional permission settings are known as extended rights. You can configure the following extended rights for a mailbox-enabled user in Active Directory:

  • · Send As
  • · Receive As
  • · View Information Store Status

26. What is catch-all mailbox?

A catch-all mailbox is typically a mailbox in your organization that is used to collect all of the e-mail messages that are sent to your organization. Depending on your preferences, the catch-all mailbox may receive all messages or only messages that are sent to mailboxes that do not exist. Transport rules on Edge Transport servers are used to copy or redirect messages that are received by your organization to the catch-all mailbox.

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